Follow as we explore the changing worlds of science and technology.
If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Find out more about the challenge here. GIF by Julian Glander and based on data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Find out more about the challenge here. GIF by Julian Glander and based on data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

This week, we’re visiting the Statoil Melkøya facility in Hammerfest, Norway, one of the northernmost towns in the world. This liquid natural gas facility is partially powered by five GE LM6000 gas turbines, each generating over 40,000 kW of power.
We’re excited to have Reuben Wu and Finn Beale with us to capture some stunning behind-the-scenes photographs. Pictured above, a vessel off the island of Melkøya in the Barents Sea prepares to ship natural gas across 15,000 nautical miles to partners globally. Photo by Reuben Wu.

This week, we’re visiting the Statoil Melkøya facility in Hammerfest, Norway, one of the northernmost towns in the world. This liquid natural gas facility is partially powered by five GE LM6000 gas turbines, each generating over 40,000 kW of power.

We’re excited to have Reuben Wu and Finn Beale with us to capture some stunning behind-the-scenes photographs. Pictured above, a vessel off the island of Melkøya in the Barents Sea prepares to ship natural gas across 15,000 nautical miles to partners globally. Photo by Reuben Wu.

A look inside the space frame tower, a new wind turbine prototype created by GE engineers. The new design uses metal latticework wrapped in a fiberglass coat and stands on five legs to provide wider support and more balance. Its unique design allows it to be transported in pieces and assembled at its final destination, which could help bring wind turbines to previously inaccessible places.

A look inside the space frame tower, a new wind turbine prototype created by GE engineers. The new design uses metal latticework wrapped in a fiberglass coat and stands on five legs to provide wider support and more balance. Its unique design allows it to be transported in pieces and assembled at its final destination, which could help bring wind turbines to previously inaccessible places.