Follow as we explore the changing worlds of science and technology.
Roboticists at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, N.Y., are investigating the future of manufacturing. They are looking at the possibility of deploying industrial robots throughout our global operations.
Rethink Robotics’ Baxter, the machine above that is now being tested in Niskayuna for possible future use, is specially designed to work around people. A human supervisor can program its moving arms to complete simple repetitive actions, and the appendages stop when they make contact with something that gets in their way. This could mean safer and healthier future working conditions.

Roboticists at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, N.Y., are investigating the future of manufacturing. They are looking at the possibility of deploying industrial robots throughout our global operations.

Rethink Robotics’ Baxter, the machine above that is now being tested in Niskayuna for possible future use, is specially designed to work around people. A human supervisor can program its moving arms to complete simple repetitive actions, and the appendages stop when they make contact with something that gets in their way. This could mean safer and healthier future working conditions.

This ultra-efficient water-jet cutter can blast through slabs of metal with ease. Engineers at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, N.Y., are investigating the computer-guided advanced milling tool for use in several industries. Here, the water jet is being tested to cut wind turbine parts from a solid aluminum ingot.

Firing an abrasive mixture of garnet dust and plain water at a pressure of 60,000 pounds per square inch, the water-jet cutter could dramatically reduce manufacturing time at GE plants.

This ultra-efficient water-jet cutter can blast through slabs of metal with ease. Engineers at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, N.Y., are investigating the computer-guided advanced milling tool for use in several industries. Here, the water jet is being tested to cut wind turbine parts from a solid aluminum ingot.

Firing an abrasive mixture of garnet dust and plain water at a pressure of 60,000 pounds per square inch, the water-jet cutter could dramatically reduce manufacturing time at GE plants.

GE engineers produced this model of a GEnx jet engine using an advanced 3-D printing technique called direct metal laser melting. Experts at GE Aviation’s Additive Development Center built the model, which measures about 1.5 inches long.

They first drafted the object with its moving parts in a digital design file, which guided a high-tech machine that fired a laser at a tray of metal powder. The laser melted layer upon layer of powder onto the growing model until it was complete. Its rotating parts were printed in an assembled state, so no fitting or welds were required.

This additive manufacturing method is producing a growing list of parts for numerous industries, making stronger components with less material waste that are impossible to create using traditional techniques.
If you’re a 3-D printing aficionado, check out GE’s Open Innovation competition, where we invite entrepreneurs, companies and institutions to offer their solutions to additive manufacturing challenges in design and production.

GE engineers produced this model of a GEnx jet engine using an advanced 3-D printing technique called direct metal laser melting. Experts at GE Aviation’s Additive Development Center built the model, which measures about 1.5 inches long.

They first drafted the object with its moving parts in a digital design file, which guided a high-tech machine that fired a laser at a tray of metal powder. The laser melted layer upon layer of powder onto the growing model until it was complete. Its rotating parts were printed in an assembled state, so no fitting or welds were required.

This additive manufacturing method is producing a growing list of parts for numerous industries, making stronger components with less material waste that are impossible to create using traditional techniques.

If you’re a 3-D printing aficionado, check out GE’s Open Innovation competition, where we invite entrepreneurs, companies and institutions to offer their solutions to additive manufacturing challenges in design and production.