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In October of 1942, the Bell XP-59A Airacomet took flight, powered by two GE I-A jet engines - the first jet engines made in the U.S. The I-A was developed in secret by a team of GE engineers, nicknamed “The Hush-Hush Boys.” In September of 1941, the team received a large package from England, containing one of the world’s first jet engines developed by British Royal Air Force officer Sir Frank Whittle. Because of GE’s extensive experience with turbo superchargers and steam turbines, the U.S. Air Force picked GE to improve on Whittle’s design. And so, the Hush-Hush Boys launched the jet age in America. Get this - to conceal the jet engine power source, the Bell XP-59A was outfitted with a wooden propeller during ground transportation. (Image source: USAF)

In October of 1942, the Bell XP-59A Airacomet took flight, powered by two GE I-A jet engines - the first jet engines made in the U.S. The I-A was developed in secret by a team of GE engineers, nicknamed “The Hush-Hush Boys.” In September of 1941, the team received a large package from England, containing one of the world’s first jet engines developed by British Royal Air Force officer Sir Frank Whittle. Because of GE’s extensive experience with turbo superchargers and steam turbines, the U.S. Air Force picked GE to improve on Whittle’s design. And so, the Hush-Hush Boys launched the jet age in America. Get this - to conceal the jet engine power source, the Bell XP-59A was outfitted with a wooden propeller during ground transportation. (Image source: USAF)