Follow as we explore the changing worlds of science and technology.
We got a new look for fashion week. Follow #iOnFashion during NYFW for original reporting on the intersection of science and fashion.

We have a passion for fashion, and have even dabbled in design ourselves. Shown here is our electric flying suit, the human exoskeleton we attempted to build in the 1960s and the moon boots we made for Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Last but not least is our recent collaboration with JackThreads on The Missions, a rare type of sneakers made with advanced materials to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the first lunar landing. 

For New York Fashion Week, we wanted to explore the intersection of fashion and science further, and today, we’re pleased to introduce GE’s #iOnFashion team. Click here to meet the science and fashion bloggers who will take over our Tumblr next week with their unique NYFW coverage.

50 years ago, famed science fiction author Isaac Asimov visited the GE exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair. Inspired by all that he witnessed, he wrote an article for the New York Times with his predictions for technological advancements in 2014.

Today, as part of our #NextList, we’re looking toward the future as well and pushing innovation across the energy, software, manufacturing and healthcare industries. The #NextList is our blueprint for progress and a declaration of belief in a future made better by brilliant minds and brilliant machines.

Read more about the Next List on Medium

At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, a demonstration of a floating plate occurs at GE’s “House of Magic,” a bit of a misnomer considering it’s not wizardry but rather science that’s responsible for the trick. According to the description on the back of the photo, a new machine created specifically for the House of Magic levitated the plate by applying the principles of magnetic induction to a non-magnetic field. Image courtesy of the New York Public Library archives. 

At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, a demonstration of a floating plate occurs at GE’s “House of Magic,” a bit of a misnomer considering it’s not wizardry but rather science that’s responsible for the trick. According to the description on the back of the photo, a new machine created specifically for the House of Magic levitated the plate by applying the principles of magnetic induction to a non-magnetic field. Image courtesy of the New York Public Library archives