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50 years ago, famed science fiction author Isaac Asimov visited the GE exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair. Inspired by all that he witnessed, he wrote an article for the New York Times with his predictions for technological advancements in 2014.

Today, as part of our #NextList, we’re looking toward the future as well and pushing innovation across the energy, software, manufacturing and healthcare industries. The #NextList is our blueprint for progress and a declaration of belief in a future made better by brilliant minds and brilliant machines.

Read more about the Next List on Medium

At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, a demonstration of a floating plate occurs at GE’s “House of Magic,” a bit of a misnomer considering it’s not wizardry but rather science that’s responsible for the trick. According to the description on the back of the photo, a new machine created specifically for the House of Magic levitated the plate by applying the principles of magnetic induction to a non-magnetic field. Image courtesy of the New York Public Library archives. 

At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, a demonstration of a floating plate occurs at GE’s “House of Magic,” a bit of a misnomer considering it’s not wizardry but rather science that’s responsible for the trick. According to the description on the back of the photo, a new machine created specifically for the House of Magic levitated the plate by applying the principles of magnetic induction to a non-magnetic field. Image courtesy of the New York Public Library archives

In the summer of 1966, New York Central Railroad engineer Don Wetzel and his team sought out to build a train that could travel at 200 mph. Given just 30 days to do so, the team bottled a pair of GE J47-19 jet engines to a railcar, and, on a clear day in July, broke a North American speed record that still stands today. We recently caught up with Wetzel at his home to hear more about the experimental vehicle. Check out the video above and learn more about the jet-powered train here

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people to walk on the moon. The giant leap was made possible by decades of scientific research, rigorous testing, and new innovations spearheaded by NASA with collaborations by many other groups and organizations, one of which was GE. Among other contributions to the technology of the Apollo program, GE researchers developed a special silicon rubber for the astronaut’s boots. This week, to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the moon landing, GE, Android Homme and JackThreads collaborated on a new sneaker called The Missions, which Buzz Aldrin is wearing in the picture above. The sneakers feature lightweight carbon fiber used for jet engine components, and a hydrophobic coating similar to the materials that prevent ice from forming on wind turbines. Read more about the collaboration at GE Reports