Follow as we explore the changing worlds of science and technology.

GE puts its materials through strenuous tests to make sure they are ready to face the most extreme situations, from high temperatures to high impact winds. 

In the top GIF, GE researchers fire aluminum oxide at 153 mph at advanced material coatings to learn how parts will stand up to extreme conditions like flying sand and dirt. 

In the middle, GE researchers ensure that the glass fiber composites used in wind turbine blades are able to withstand tremendous amounts of force. 

Finally, the last GIF shows a red hot piece of nickel alloy after being removed from a metal forging test at GE’s Global Research center. The test will help inform large-scale forging operations for steam turbines. 

Join us on April 23rd to see how everyday objects hold up to the same rigorous testing. In the meantime, see more of these materials being put through their paces here

If only water desalination were this easy. 
Many countries around the world depend on desalination to produce fresh water, and although this solution is effective, it’s also energy-intensive. Energy consumption accounts for 70 percent of the cost of desalination and the process uses enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why GE recently launched an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Learn more here. 

If only water desalination were this easy. 

Many countries around the world depend on desalination to produce fresh water, and although this solution is effective, it’s also energy-intensive. Energy consumption accounts for 70 percent of the cost of desalination and the process uses enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why GE recently launched an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Learn more here

If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Find out more about the challenge here. GIF by Julian Glander and based on data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Find out more about the challenge here. GIF by Julian Glander and based on data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

In the 1960s, GE engineers developed the Cybernetic Anthropmorophous Machine, or Walking Truck. In 1966, the US Army awarded GE a contract for building the experimental vehicle. However, its hand and foot controls not only fatigued operators, but were impractical for prolonged use on the battlefield, so the project was discontinued. Kevin Weir at flux machine recently reanimated the Walking Truck so the mechanical beast could gallop once more.

In the 1960s, GE engineers developed the Cybernetic Anthropmorophous Machine, or Walking Truck. In 1966, the US Army awarded GE a contract for building the experimental vehicle. However, its hand and foot controls not only fatigued operators, but were impractical for prolonged use on the battlefield, so the project was discontinued. Kevin Weir at flux machine recently reanimated the Walking Truck so the mechanical beast could gallop once more.