Follow as we explore the changing worlds of science and technology.
It’s time for the next #GEInstaWalk! This time we’re going to Cape Cod, MA on May 13th with Jared Chambers, Benjamin Heath and Laura Pritchett to explore 1.5-77 megawatt GE wind turbines. We’d also like to bring three of our biggest fans along. Follow us on Instagram and comment on this photo by April 21st why you believe wind energy is awesome. You could win a chance to climb 260ft up a turbine!
NoPurNec18+Rules @ ge.com/instawalk/terms

It’s time for the next #GEInstaWalk! This time we’re going to Cape Cod, MA on May 13th with Jared Chambers, Benjamin Heath and Laura Pritchett to explore 1.5-77 megawatt GE wind turbines. We’d also like to bring three of our biggest fans along. Follow us on Instagram and comment on this photo by April 21st why you believe wind energy is awesome. You could win a chance to climb 260ft up a turbine!

NoPurNec18+Rules @ ge.com/instawalk/terms

If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Find out more about the challenge here. GIF by Julian Glander and based on data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open innovation challenge to improve the energy efficiency of water desalination. Find out more about the challenge here. GIF by Julian Glander and based on data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

In the 1960s, GE engineers developed the Cybernetic Anthropmorophous Machine, or Walking Truck. In 1966, the US Army awarded GE a contract for building the experimental vehicle. However, its hand and foot controls not only fatigued operators, but were impractical for prolonged use on the battlefield, so the project was discontinued. Kevin Weir at flux machine recently reanimated the Walking Truck so the mechanical beast could gallop once more.

In the 1960s, GE engineers developed the Cybernetic Anthropmorophous Machine, or Walking Truck. In 1966, the US Army awarded GE a contract for building the experimental vehicle. However, its hand and foot controls not only fatigued operators, but were impractical for prolonged use on the battlefield, so the project was discontinued. Kevin Weir at flux machine recently reanimated the Walking Truck so the mechanical beast could gallop once more.

In 1876, Thomas Edison patented the Electric Stencil-Pen, an invention intended to help clerks reproduce documents. It featured a sharp vibrating needle that could puncture a sheet of paper 50 times per second. Users dragged it along lines of text to create tiny holes in the paper that allowed ink to sink through to papers underneath. The Electric Stencil-Pen is a relatively unknown invention, but if the process sounds familiar, that’s because it helped revolutionize the modern tattoo industry. In 1891, New York tattoo artist Samuel F. O’Reilly produced an electric tattoo needle based on the design. The speed and precision of the tool made getting inked quicker and more efficient than ever before. 

In 1876, Thomas Edison patented the Electric Stencil-Pen, an invention intended to help clerks reproduce documents. It featured a sharp vibrating needle that could puncture a sheet of paper 50 times per second. Users dragged it along lines of text to create tiny holes in the paper that allowed ink to sink through to papers underneath. The Electric Stencil-Pen is a relatively unknown invention, but if the process sounds familiar, that’s because it helped revolutionize the modern tattoo industry. In 1891, New York tattoo artist Samuel F. O’Reilly produced an electric tattoo needle based on the design. The speed and precision of the tool made getting inked quicker and more efficient than ever before. 

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 
Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 

Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?”