Follow as we explore the changing worlds of science and technology.

50 years ago, famed science fiction author Isaac Asimov visited the GE exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair. Inspired by all that he witnessed, he wrote an article for the New York Times with his predictions for technological advancements in 2014.

Today, as part of our #NextList, we’re looking toward the future as well and pushing innovation across the energy, software, manufacturing and healthcare industries. The #NextList is our blueprint for progress and a declaration of belief in a future made better by brilliant minds and brilliant machines.

Read more about the Next List on Medium

At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, a demonstration of a floating plate occurs at GE’s “House of Magic,” a bit of a misnomer considering it’s not wizardry but rather science that’s responsible for the trick. According to the description on the back of the photo, a new machine created specifically for the House of Magic levitated the plate by applying the principles of magnetic induction to a non-magnetic field. Image courtesy of the New York Public Library archives. 

At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, a demonstration of a floating plate occurs at GE’s “House of Magic,” a bit of a misnomer considering it’s not wizardry but rather science that’s responsible for the trick. According to the description on the back of the photo, a new machine created specifically for the House of Magic levitated the plate by applying the principles of magnetic induction to a non-magnetic field. Image courtesy of the New York Public Library archives

Veterinarians and wildlife biologists in Sydney, Australia are using GE ultrasound equipment to fight the chlamydia infections currently plaguing populations of koala bears. Chlamydia is a serious disease for these furry faces. It’s both difficult to diagnose, and capable of causing a host of complications, including internal organ damage and sometimes death. However, if treated in time, it is curable, and researchers are using the ultrasound equipment for early detection. Learn more about how ultrasound is being used to help vulnerable populations of koalas at GE Reports. 

Veterinarians and wildlife biologists in Sydney, Australia are using GE ultrasound equipment to fight the chlamydia infections currently plaguing populations of koala bears. Chlamydia is a serious disease for these furry faces. It’s both difficult to diagnose, and capable of causing a host of complications, including internal organ damage and sometimes death. However, if treated in time, it is curable, and researchers are using the ultrasound equipment for early detection. Learn more about how ultrasound is being used to help vulnerable populations of koalas at GE Reports